“Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts, as much as their brothers do; they suffer from too rigid a restraint, to absolute a stagnation, precisely as men would suffer; and it is narrow-minded in their more privileged fellow-creatures to say that they ought to confine themselves to making puddings and knitting stockings, to playing on the piano and embroidering bags. It is thoughtless to condemn them, or laugh at them, if they seek to do more or learn more than custom has pronounced necessary for their sex.”- Jane Eyre.

This gothic classic, written by Charlotte Brontë, was in all certainty, a revolutionary portrayal of romance. The protagonist, who lends her name to the title of the book, was fiercely independent, morally inspiring and incredibly heroic. The consistent assertions made about equality by Eyre are meaningful, legitimate and firm. Her sense of self-awareness, along with her ability to confront injustice makes her a true icon in feminism. She also shuns the conventional notions of what a women should be and what a woman must do. Instead of regarding marriage as an institution, she regards it as a declaration of true love, something that was unheard of in the aristocratic circles of the Victorian Era.

A poor orphan and a recipient of obstacles at each turn, Jane never seeks external charity and remains determined to make it on her own. At the same time, she preserves her self-identity, and gains a sense of empowerment. Unconventional and brave, she sets forth the ideals of feminism through each decision she makes throughout the course of the novel. Her expression of her right to freedom through the following lines, will continue to remain a cornerstone of women’s struggles: “I am no bird; and no net ensnares me; I am a free human being with an independent will.” It is no secret that women have come a long way in the past century, and the roots of feminism along with the commencement of its expression can be appreciated through such women-centric classics. 

Charlotte Brontë disregards patriarchal notions through the portrayal of the legendary Jane Eyre. She cleverly contrives a narrative that reflects upon baseless social norms, and sets an unprecedented benchmark of autonomy and entitlement. Specifically in the context of nineteenth century, I truly consider Jane Eyre (both the novel and the character) as contributions in advocacy of women’s rights. A woman’s individuality and intellect are often impugned in the world we live in. Women are considered physically and mentally inferior to men, while they are expected to act morally superior. In this conflicting proposition, Jane Eyre stands out as a piece of literature that must be read, and read again until we are convinced of the power of women.

13 Comments

  1. Jane Eyre is a remarkable woman. As was Charlotte Brontë.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Isha says:

      Indeed. Thank you for reading!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Absolutely excellent.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Isha says:

      Thank you for reading! Glad you liked it!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. elvira797mx says:

    Jane Eyre, an amazing woman. One of my favorites. Thank’s for share, Isha.
    Keep well.
    Elvira

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Isha says:

      Thank you for reading. 🌻

      Like

      1. elvira797mx says:

        You are welcome, Isha🌸🌼🌸

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Elouise says:

    yes, yes, yes! Worth reading more than once. Great review, Isha.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Isha says:

      Thank you so much! 🥰

      Like

  5. beth says:

    i so agree with you isha, so well said.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Isha says:

      Thank you very much! 🌸

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply to Isha Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s